Season Ticket Drive is March 1st!

It’s official! Seattle’s NHL season ticket drive will be launching March 1st. Today at Mayor Jenny Durkin’s State of the City Address she announced that the season ticket drive will launch March 1st with more information available at

This is the next big milestone in making NHL to Seattle a reality.

Is there a target number?

If there is a number, it hasn’t been shared. I feel it is more or less a moot point as I expect it to sell out based on a Nielsen report that cited 70,000 people “interested” in a NHL season tickets in the Seattle area. It is not clear if there will be any partial season ticket inside-Hockeyplans available out of the gate. If you want to be part of the inaugural season, then my advice would be to create your own season ticket group. (i.e. find 4 people that want a half season and then get 2 Season tickets.) Full season ticket holders generally get first selection of seats as well.

The Vegas Timeline

Comparing the Seattle process to the Vegas process is a bit of apples and oranges. Back in 2015, Vegas launched their ticket drive February 10th hitting their goal of 10,000 season ticket holders by March 23rd. Then, on June 24th, the NHL announced that it was accepting expansion applications that would due July 20th. The Vegas franchise would not officially be awarded for another year, in June of 2016.

The Seattle process is almost opposite. The application announcement has come before the ticket drive. On December 7th, the NHL announced that they would “accept and consider” expansion application from Seattle. Last week, on February 13th, the league confirmed that it had received the Seattle groups application.

Here is your action plan:

  1. Block your calendar for 10am on March 1st
  2. Peruse the website
  3. Connect to the official NHL Seattle social media outlets:
    a. Instagram
    b. Facebook
    c. Twitter
  4. Plan your season ticket plan – If you are not planning on a full season ticket plan, talk to friends and coworkers about sharing a package. I don’t anticipate there will be any partial plans.
  5. Be at a computer on March 1st at 10 am.
  6. Start saving $


The homestretch for the Sodo Arena

I will cut to the chase really quickly. The SoDo Arena project has one last hurdle to be shovel ready. Here are two things you can do to help out:

  1. Sign the SonicsArena petition.
  2. Show up to the Seattle City Council public hearing on the Street Vacation at Occidental on March 15th.

For a little more narrative…keep reading.

The Seattle Arena project in SoDo that was kicked off around December of 2011 is closing in on the final steps for approval. The only remaining obstacle is a city council vote on a street vacation of a stretch of Occidental just south of Safeco field. The city council vote is being projected on an estimated date of April 24th with an important public hearing on March 15th.  The street vacation was part of the 2-year Environmental Impact Study (EIS) that found no major findings that would stand in the way of arena construction. The streetSeattleArena vacation has already received recommendations / approvals from the Seattle Design Commission, Downtown Design Review Board, Seattle Department of Transportation, and the Mayor as part of the normal process with the City Council vote. It is seen as the last step before filing for a Master Use Permit to begin construction. Sonics Rising published an great article on what being shovel ready means to the leagues.

The Port of Seattle and the Mariners claim that vacating that block will have a big impact on traffic. I ventured down there to snap some photos over the course of a couple days of all the traffic on that street that will be diverted elsewhere.


As you can see, there is not much, if any, traffic that will be impacted, but you should not take a post of phone pictures as proof there is no traffic. You should take the word of a 600+ page Final Environmental Impact study that took close to 2 years that says with some mitigations that there will be minimal economic impact.

NHL impacts

Even though the SoDo arena is being driven by an NBA group led by Chris Hansen, that group has maintained a desire to house an NHL team, as well. Over a year ago, it was reported that Victor Coleman is the potential NHL franchise owner that was looking to partner with Hansen. Coleman has remained quiet on his intentions and dealings with Hansen. Less than 30 days ago he pretty much said no comment to a Business Journal interview on the status of his desire to bring an NHL team to Seattle, but it is clear he has not abandoned the efforts. There has been some speculation that Coleman is waiting for the final vote before going public with his intentions of reaching a deal with Chris Hansen. This might be a little wishful thinking, but we should find out soon.

The bottom line is that the only way Seattle gets a team is if they have a solid arena plan. The Sodo site remains the furthest arena project along and the only one that appears to be moving forward.

 MOU and an NHL first scenario

As many of you are aware, the current Memorandum of Understanding calls for an NBA team before any of the $120M in city bond funding will kick in. What that means in a case of an NHL first scenario is still an open question. It could mean that under the current MOU, an NHL first scenario the arena would need to be entirely privately financed. It could also mean that the MOU would need to be amended to accommodate an NHL first scenario. I am certain the players involved certainly know the steps required to start building and are keeping the matter quiet until we get passed the street vacation vote.

RMHC Hockey Challenge 2016

Once again I have the honor of playing in the Ronald McDonald House Hockey Challenge. This is an annual event put on by the Seattle Thunderbirds and the Ronald McDonald House of Western Washington and Alaska. If you don’t know what the Ronald McDonald House is all about, you should. 1063679_100150506978_990452666_nThe Seattle Ronald McDonald House is a home-away-from-home for 700 families each year while their seriously ill child receives medical treatment at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Some families stay for nights, some for months. The House is a warm, supportive and safe place during a very difficult time. Over the years I’ve met with families and discussed their stories and I can tell you it is one amazing charity that has a real impact on people’s lives.

The purpose of the Hockey Challenge is to raise money from the RMHC. This is the one time of year I ask for a little help. I am willing to match up to $1,000 of whatever is contributed in the next two weeks. As a bonus, if I can get over 100 donors, I will be putting in an additional $500. If I can get 100 people to put in just $10, I will match $1,500. Let’s make it happen.  

 The Hockey Challenge is held on February 27th at ShoWare Arena in conjunction with the Seattle Thunderbirds-Everett Silvertips game. After the Thunderbirds game, a group of all-stars will take the ice for a fun game between local celebrities, former Thunderbirds and some former NHLs. I will be one of the pylons in the all-star game watching the former NHLs skate circles around me.

 Please help me out by contributing here at my fundraising page.

 Just $10 dollars can go a long way.



2015 NHL to Seattle Report Card

I am giving out grades for 2015 and it is not pretty. I am optimistic on Seattle getting an NHL team but we have work to do.

Last year at this time the outlook for a potential NHL franchise in Seattle was looking promising. The NHL approved Las Vegas to begin a Season Ticket drive. And the Sodo arena process was expected to wrap up during the first part of the year.


At the start of 2015, Victor Coleman was the only known prospective NHL owner for a Seattle franchise with a likely partnership with Chris Hansen’s Sodo project. The optimists were convinced that Hansen and Coleman were working on an agreement and the moment the NHL decides to expand, they would go public with their plan. As the year would go on,raybartoszek-300x285 two additional ownership groups would emerge. In the first quarter of 2015, Ray Bartoszek would reemerge as a potential NHL owner in Seattle but it would not be at the Sodo location. Instead, his focus was on the Tukwila location. Shortly after the Bartoszek group news, another interested group in team ownership in Bellevue headed by Jac Sperling was reportedly looking to build an arena in Bellevue. The NHL season would go on with very few details or public comments from any of the 3 reported ownership groups. In mid-June, just after the Season concluded, the NHL would formally announce that they would enter an expansion process. It was reported that 4 groups from the Seattle area requested an NHL Expansion application. It was assumed that 3 of the 4 would be Coleman, Bartozek, and Sperling. The 4th ownership group would never be identified. The NHL Expansion Application deadline came and went with exactly zero application submissions from the Seattle area. The Sperling group disappeared or more accurately never really fully appeared. In spite of missing the NHL expansion deadline, both Bartoszek and Coleman pledged their commitment to bring a team to the area. Neither group was very publicly transparent in their progress throughout the year. Towards the end of 2015, the prospects of a Bartoszek group and Tukwila location coming together start to fade with a report that a major investor walkedColemanVictor8475_sb10_750 away on the Tukwila plan. This would end 2015 just like we started. All hope lives and dies with Victor Coleman, who we can only hope remains convicted on his plans to bring an NHL team to Seattle.

Grade: I (for incomplete) It remains unclear on the progress and potential of any of these ownership groups. The optimists says, there is no need for Coleman to reveal his progress and he will emerge when he needs to come public. The pessimists says the silence is defining…this project is dead.


2015 was supposed to be the year the Sodo Arena ran through all their final approvals, studies and the “Seattle process”. Early in the year, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray would renew his support for the Sodo arena. He would make a visit to New York to meet with Gary Bettman and Adam Silver to give an update on Sodo and pledge support to bring an NHL and/or NBA team to Seattle. Meanwhile, high-level arena proposals would be reported for Tukwila and Bellevue. These new arenas would be noticeably behind in the approval process compared to the Seattle arena, but both Populationmunicipalities have a quicker approval process, thus giving both locations have a legitimate chance at competing with Sodo. Noticeable progress would be made on the Tukwila option which would start to emerge as a front runner to be the future home of a NHL franchise. Similar to Bellevue ownership group, details on the Bellevue arena option would never emerge. The thought of a Bellevue Arena had Eastsiders salivating and could have been the best unicorn that ever unicorned in this storyline. By year’s end, the Tukwila arena progress would slow and appears to be dying a slow death.

On the Sodo front, the final Environmental Impact Study was published with glowing reviews of public benefit and no material impact to port traffic. The Port of Seattle would continue their anti-Arena campaigning without any supporting evidence. Sodo would obtain necessary approvals from the Design Commission and Mayor Murray would end the year by sending the project to the Seattle City Council for final approval of vacating a side street necessary for the Arena. Although the final approval of the Sodo arena took much longer than expected, it appears it is on the final approach. Once it clears this final political hurdle, unfortunately, the path to build remains muddy without the prospects of either an NBA or NHL team.

Grade: D  I respect all the work that was done by Hansen and Bartoszek but like the ownership group, we start 2016 exactly how we started 2015. With a reported 3 different options you would have expected at least one to emerge to be shovel ready or at least have a clear path to completion. It is still not clear how Sodo gets done without an NBA Team coming first and an NBA team seems over 5 years away.


The third pillar to getting a NHL team is actually landing a team. This can be done either through relocation or expansion. People that know me or have followed me long enough know that I have never been a fan of relocation. I believe in this sport too much to concede a market due to an ownership setback or poor performance on the ice. That said, it would be a disservice to ignore the potential of relocation.

Relocation – Entering the year, the public perception was that the Coyotes and the Panthers were potential relocation targets. The Coyotes were mid-way through their second year of 10 year agreement (with an out clause 200px-Phoenix_Coyotes.svgafter 5 years). Meanwhile, the Florida Panthers were in the middle of their first full season with their new ownership group headed by Vincent Viola. The Coyotes were making progress on their turnaround, but struggles on the ice would make things tougher to hit the forecasted revenues that would be paid back to the City of Glendale. Although not directly tied to the Glendale revenue shortcomings, the City would cancel their 10-year agreement with the Arizona Coyotes leaving the future of the team in limbo. The city and team would eventually sign a 2 year agreement that would enable the team to continue playing at Gila River Casino Arena. Where the team plays after that remains unclear, but odds are they stay in the desert and play in a new arena in either Scottsdale or downtown Phoenix. Back to Florida, the Panthers ownership group remained committed to staying in South Florida. The group began seeing improvements in attendance and remained committed to building a solid team on the ice. Separately, the Panthers negotiated a new agreement with Broward County that would keep the Panthers in Florida through 2028. The year would end with neither team looking like relocation candidates for the immediate term.

 Expansion – They NHL would formally launch an expansion process over the summer. As noted above, the deadline would come and go without a potential Seattle area ownership group applying for expansion. This was the opportunity Seattle was waiting for and by all intents and purposes, ready for. The awarding of expansion franchises has been slower than the public (aka media) expected, leaving some folks to speculate that the NHL is waiting for a group in Seattle to develop a legitimate plan. This seems like a little bit of wishful thinking, but the longer the NHL drags out its decision on expansion, the more opportunity it gives Seattle to get their arena and ownership ducks in a row.

Grade: B+  There are teams (via expansion) available. Has the door shut on Seattle for one of those teams? Maybe, but time will tell.


The NHL to Seattle community had a great year. This scrappy grassroots community continues to evolve, which surprises me every year. We received check-ins from several rinks across the league (and world). The final 20151012bcommunity practically demanded t-shirts and I’ve had to reorder multiple times and have expanded “product lines” based on community interest. We had our first annual playoff viewing party, expanded our opening day challenge, and had our first holiday party.

Grade: A+  I may be biased here, but seeing how this community has grown and evolved since 2012, there is no other grade possible.

We had some rather big expectations but this is tremendously complex. A lot of work has been done to get us to this point and without a viable arena plan, the path to landing a franchise remains unclear. I remain optimistic but I also don’t want people assuming this is going to happen anytime soon. This community has been outstanding and we need to continue to grow to make our voices heard to local politicians, the NHL, and potential owners.

The FEIS and what’s next

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

As scheduled, the Final Environmental Impact Statement on the Seattle Arena was released Thursday morning and as expected, the results were favorable.

This news is being picked up everywhere but the most thorough article came locally from Chris Daniels and Geoff Baker.

Chris Daniel’s Article here.

Geoff Baker’s article is here.

The Puget Sound Business Journal also had a good summary piece on the economics.

Here are some highlighted tweets of the coverage:

Sonics Arena Statement

Within a couple hours of the FEIS being released, the SonicsArena camp released a statement. There was an entire HockeyView_SonicLevel3paragraph on an NHL first scenario.

We also wanted to take the opportunity to reiterate that we remain 100% supportive of the NHL returning to Seattle and playing in the Arena — and are completely open to the prospect of that occurring prior to the NBA. In light of recent speculation, we would just like to clarify that we have sought to be as accommodating as possible in our negotiations with potential NHL partners, with our only major requirements being that such a deal does not jeopardize the process or put the City, County, Taxpayers or us in a worse financial position.

This is consistent with the Hansen camp’s position from the very beginning. In an interview late 2012 with King 5, Hansen said that an NHL first scenario would be possible in the right scenario. At the time, NBA expansion or relocation looked like more of a possibility which made the scenario less likely. Comments from Victor Coleman last week have muddied the waters a bit so it is great to see the Hansen group affirm their position.

Port of Seattle Opposition

Consistent with the ports messaging throughout this entire process. They released this statement on their opposition to the Arena and the EIS findings. In my three plus years of following this project, the Port has never provided any data on the impacts of the Arena to their business and have never appeared to be collaborative in this project. We should expect more and more of this type of PR from the port.

What is next?

Now that the Final EIS hurdle has been cleared, a couple things will start to play out. For an NHL first scenario, a prospective NHL owner will need to strike a deal with the Hansen group. Once that happens, the Hansen group will need to take a proposal to the Mayor to change the current MOU to be an NHL first scenario. This will more than likely need to happen in PopulationAugust so that the Mayor can bring it to the city council for vote in September.

In the meantime, the NHL has two key Board of Governors meetings, one before the NHL Draft in June and another in September. As reported last week, it appears they will “vote” on expansion in September. Since the news did not come from the league, it is up to us to define “vote”. Most people interpret this “vote” as to start the application process and not necessarily, awarding the franchise.

Meanwhile, the Tukwila arena proposal moves forward and should be considered a major competitor to the SoDo Arena regardless if there is movement on the NHL first scenario in Sodo.

As I tell most people, this is a rollercoaster, try not to get too high or too low on any news. So let’s celebrate the victory but do not assume this thing is a done deal. Lots and lots of work still remain.

Potential Seattle NHL Ownership Groups Revealed

Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times backed up his article last week on the arena locations with this piece on potential NHL ownership groups in Seattle. Long story short, there appears to be 3 potential groups roughly aligned to the 3 sites.

I created this handy dandy diagram to make sense of it all. Tod Leiweke and Thomas Tull were mentioned in the article as being part of the ownership groups but that seemed more speculative in nature which is why I did not include them in the diagram.

Ownership LandscapeOne last shameless plug, I am trying to get 100 people to donate $10 to the RMHC of Seattle just so I can donate $1500. Please consider donating. I am up to $410.


Breaking down the 3 arena options

In case you missed it, Gary Bettman mentioned Tukwila and Bellevue as potential sites for an NHL arena in the Seattle Area on a radio interview in Vancouver. Stick tap goes to Paul Rogers, from, for covering the news ahead of our more traditional media outlets. Geoff Baker from the Seattle Times then published this article with a lot more detail on the specific locations. As much as I love the SoDo location, it is great to see that Seattle’s dreams of landing an NHL team are not tied to any one plan. I breakdown the 3 locations by population, income, and driving distance.


Puget Sound Population Map3

Seattle has ~ 6 times the population base of Bellevue. It is worth pointing out that Seattle’s area (142 Sq Miles) is much larger than Bellevue’s (36 Sq Miles). For this reason, to get a fair comparison you could include Kirkland, Redmond, and Sammamish. If you combine those populations, the Bellevue area has ~325K compared to Seattle’s ~650K. The closest comparable NHL market could be Minneapolis-St. Paul. The city of Tukwila is much, much smaller, but based on the location of the reported site, it is literally on the southern border of the Seattle city limits.

Side note: I received over 15 times more responses from people living in Seattle vs people living in Bellevue when I launched my original survey.


We have already established that the NHL fans have the highest income levels of the big 4 Professional Sports Leagues. For income comparisons, I used IRS adjustable income reporting data from 2012 by zip code that I then consolidated into city. I filtered on how many IRS tax returns had an adjustable income of over 75K by city. This is not to say that the only people going to NHL games will be individuals/households that make over 75K a year but a large amount of Season Ticket holders will come from this income bracket.

Puget Sound IRS returns Map

Similar to the population levels, Seattle has a significant amount of households with tax return Adjustable Income over $75K when comparing to Bellevue. However, when you add Bellevue, Kirkland, Redmond, Sammamish, Issaquah and Newcastle, the number is much closer than the population number: Seattle has ~117,000 households to Eastside collective around ~100,000 households.


Seattle arena map

From a distance perspective, Bellevue and SoDo are somewhat of a wash. Yes, traffic won’t be great regardless of the route, but 10 Miles seems like a reasonable distance to travel to a game for either side of the lake. Certainly, there are more people working in downtown Seattle during the week, but there are obviously quite a few companies located on the Eastside, as well (Microsoft, T-Mobile, Costco, etc…). From downtown Seattle, Tukwila seems like a reasonable distance, even closer than Bellevue.

In a perfect world, a potential owner could obtain some data from a few NHL teams that show the distance traveled from season ticket holders & single game ticket purchases to analyze the viability of the three locations. If I had my pick, I would analyze San Jose, Colorado & Minnesota ticket sales by zip code.

Side note: 35% of respondents to one of my surveys over the summer, sited “Inconvenient Location” as the reason why they did not watch more WHL hockey game.

Here are a few distances for other NBA/NHL arenas:

Canadian Tire Center, home of the Ottawa Senators:

  • 16.6 Miles from downtown Ottawa

St. Paul MN, home of the Minnesota Wild:

  • 12.4 Miles from Minneapolis

The Palace at Auburn Hills, home of the Detroit Pistons:

  • 33 Miles from Detroit

Glendale AZ, home of the Arizona Coyotes:

  • 10 Miles from Phoenix
  • 21 Miles from Scottsdale
  • 27 Miles from Mesa

Sunrise FL, home of the Florida Panthers

  • Sunrise, FL is 31.2 Miles from Miami


On an unrelated note and a shameless plug, I am trying to get 100 people to donate $10 to the RMHC of Seattle just so I can donate $1500. Please consider donating